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Value Based Education

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Values-based Education works through:

  • Values Consciousness20170317 112922
    Teachers think more deeply about their teaching and the values that they model both in and outside of the classroom. Students report how a values consciousness impact on their behaviour and actions, which become more altruistic.
  • Wellbeing
    In thinking about and enacting values, students develop self-worth, empathy and responsible personal behaviour. Evidence shows that Values Education has a very positive effect on students who are ‘at risk’, marginalised or disadvantaged. There is compelling evidence that wellbeing impacts are experienced by teachers, parents and families, and in classroom and across whole schools.
  • Agency
    Agency is the capacity of individuals to be self-led, to act independently, to make choices and act on them. The evidence shows that Values Education strengthens student agency when it involves various forms of giving, outreach and working in the community. For instance, through values action projects that allowed students to enact their values in a way that is personal, real and deeply engaging.
  • Connectedness
    Values-based Education builds positive and wide-ranging connections between teachers, students and parents. It supports student engagement in learning, improves parent engagement in their children’s learning and allows teachers to develop new relationships with their students, each other and the parents and families in their school community. This is done through shared goals and practices in Values Education, which leads to the development of mutual feelings of respect, trust and safety; and varied opportunities for collaboration. The research findings show that the values lead to improved behaviour in the classroom, school and home.
  • Transformation
    Change and transformation are at the heart of Values Education and is the result of teachers and students being urged to engage in continuous reflection on the actions they implemented in their schools. Key changes are seen in professional practice as well as personal attitudes, behaviours, relationships and group dynamics. Transformations are experienced and observed by teachers, students and parents alike. The data points to profound transformations in student learning. Students develop deeper understanding of complex issues and how these pertain to their own lives. Students and parents experience personal change and report changes seen in others.
  • Achievement
    As a result of the above, many schools report improvements in a wide range of individual achievement, and academic attainment. Students report a deeper engagement in and connection to their learning and demonstrate an understanding of the responsibilities this entails for themselves and others.

What Values Are
Values are principles that drive behaviour. They influence our actions and attitudes, and become our framework for living. They influence our relationship with ourselves and others.

The wide range of positive human values encouraged in schools include patience, respect, fairness, tolerance, respect, compassion and collaboration.

Like riding a bike, values are learned through a combination of practice and instruction. Students learn what values are, how to recognise them, and how people react to them, equipping them with invaluable social skills and emotional intelligence.


What Values Are Not
Values education is not additional curriculum. It is not something teachers have to bolt on to an already full agenda. It is an approach that makes teaching the very full agenda easier.

It is not a quick fix solution. Many people perceive values to be liberal and soft. In reality, they are exactly the opposite. They provide a clear awareness of acceptable behaviour, against which staff and students choices of behaviour are evaluated. Values help reduce the options for inappropriate behaviour.

It is not something expected only of students. Effective teaching of values is measured not by students' ability to define values, by its impact on their behaviour. For teaching of values to be effective, positive values need to be modelled by staff. A values-driven environment applies equally to staff and students alike. 

Schools become a place where students experience positive values in context. They learn how to apply and talk about values appropriately. They become self-motivated, and their behaviour becomes calm and purposeful. Division in schools reduces, collaboration between students increases and values underpin a sense of unity and positive direction. Values work in a dynamic way through developing aspects such as leadership focus, positive role modelling and community values.

Values-based Education offers:

  • A fundamental approach to high quality schooling, influencing and enabling students to develop fully as individuals and creating connectedness to parents and the wider community.

  • A philosophy of being and living that permeates organizational policy and day-to-day practice and supports students to develop reflective practices and self-responsibility for behaviour and actions.

  • A practical and transformative tool which enables students to shape their future and gives meaning and purpose to their lives.

  • The development of an integrated and aspirational community ethos that can help to redress the effects of disadvantage through securing and enabling the agreed values to remain powerful, effective and salient across the organisation.

 

Mark Warren, Vice Principle of Key Stage 3 at St Marks Academy in Mitcham, talks about why
his school chose to work with values, and the impact it has had on the pupils. 

In a Values-based school, children develop a secure sense of self. The become more empowered to take responsibility for their own learning. Research shows that children develop academic diligence when they are involved with a Values-based school. They develop relational trust. They become articulate and able to talk freely and well. Through silence, quietness and reflectional techniques of the Values-based framework, children can understand much more deeply their work and their lives.

From the social perspective, Values-based Education promotes effective learning and underpins the continuous improvement of personal, social, moral and economic wellbeing. It is an investment in individual capability and self-responsibility and its product, therefore, promises significant value to society. 


Neil Balliston talks about the role of the Ethical Vocabulary

Below are some examples showing the impact of VbE, which have been related to us by schools that have successfully embedded VbE in their whole school approach:

• Improved staff and pupil relationships20160909 191908
• Improved student self-discipline and altruistic behaviour
• Improved quality of education
• Improved climate for education: fearless teaching
• Improved parent/community relationships
• Improved individual empowerment: allowing space for pupils to take responsibility
• Improved emotional climate for learning – less stress!
• Improved child-centred pedagogy
• Improved educational standards

 

VbE in Primary Schools

The school is a microcosm of the world. VbE is an approach that nourishes, and enables learners to flourish, making a difference to the world through who and how they are.

When we actively engage with values we start to understand their implications for making choices about our attitudes and responses. A Values-based approach encourages reflective and aspirational attributes and attitudes. These can be nurtured to help people discover the very best of themselves, which enables them to be good citizens and prepare them for the life of work.

VbE creates a better learning environment, in which students are able to attain better academic results. It creates a better teaching environment, in which staff are more fulfilled and significantly less stressed. It equips students with social capacities that help them work with, and relate to others effectively. It provides them with the self-esteem and confidence to explore and develop their full potential. It leaves no student behind, irrespective of their background.

 

 

An interview with Washingborough Academy, a values-based school,
about what makes VbE such a powerful tool to improve their pupils' chances in life

 

 VbE in Secondary Schools
Schools become a place where students experience positive values in context. They learn how to apply and talk about values appropriately. They become self-motivated, and their behaviour becomes calm and purposeful. Division in schools reduces, collaboration between students increases and values underpin a sense of unity and positive direction. Values work in a dynamic way through developing aspects such as leadership focus, positive role modelling and community values.

Values-based Education offers:

  • A fundamental approach to high quality schooling, influencing and enabling students to develop fully as individuals and creating connectedness to parents and the wider community.
  • A philosophy of being and living that permeates organizational policy and day-to-day practice and supports students to develop reflective practices and self-responsibility for behaviour and actions.
  • A practical and transformative tool which enables students to shape their future and gives meaning and purpose to their lives.
  • The development of an integrated and aspirational community ethos that can help to redress the effects of disadvantage through securing and enabling the agreed values to remain powerful, effective and salient across the organisation.

 

Mark Warren, Vice Principle of Key Stage 3 at St Marks Academy in Mitcham, talks about why
his school chose to work with values, and the impact it has had on the pupils. 

 

 

 

 

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Values-based Education Limited

Chalk Pit Nursery,
Chalk Pit Lane,
Burnham Bucks
SL1 8WD
United Kingdom  
Telephone: +44 1628 660665
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